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Thread: Official Cigar Discussion Thread

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    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Official Cigar Discussion Thread

    Cigar History

    The first modern observation of the cigar occurred with the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the New World. On October 28, 1492 Columbus noted in his log reports that the natives of San Salvador burned and inhaled the leaves of a local plant. Rodrigo de Xeres, a lieutenant on Columbus's expedition became the first European to smoke the Indian's form of a cigar. Rodrigo smoked on every subsequent day of the expedition.

    The Indians in South and Central America did not smoke cigars as we know them today. The natives smoked tobacco wrapped in maize, palm or other native vegetation. The Spanish created the cigar industry, and are given credit for creating the modern cigar.

    The Origin of the word cigar comes from the native language of the ancient Mayans. The Mayans called the cigar a "Ciq-Sigan" which the Spanish word "Cigarro" is derived from. The New English Dictionary of 1735 called the cigar a "seegar", and was later adapted into the modern word "cigar".



    Cigar Manufacturing

    The tobacco that is rolled into cigars is primarily grown in the tropical regions of the world. Africa, Brazil, the Canary Islands, Connecticut, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Ecuador, Nicaragua, and Sumatra are world renown in growing the quality tobacco that is used in the various components of a cigar.

    Tobacco is planted in late September and generally takes two months to reach maturity. Harvesting begins before the plants flower and can take several months as the leaves are harvested in different phases.

    Once the tobacco is harvested the leaves are sent to "tobacco barns" where the tobacco is dried. Leaves are tied in pairs and hung for the curing process. The tobacco barn faces from west so that the sun hits one side in the morning and one side at night. The doors at either side can be opened or closed to keep the temperature constant. The tobacco is kept in the barn for approximately 2 months while the leaves change color from green to yellow to brown.

    After the leaves are dried, they are carefully laid into large piles for fermentation, where they are kept for several months. The piles are moistened and covered in cloth and are watched closely as the temperature can rise and harm the tobacco. The fermentation reduces natural resins, ammonia and nicotine present in the tobacco leaves.

    The fermented tobacco is taken to warehouses, stored in large bales and allowed to slowly mature. The aging process can last from several months to many years depending on the quality desired.

    Once the aged tobacco reaches the factory, the leaves are graded according to size, color, and quality. Leaves that are torn or have holes are set aside and used primarily as filler. Finally the leaves are de-veined by removing the center vein from the leaf.
    There are three basic components that make up a cigar.
    1. The filler.
    2. The binder.
    3. The wrapper.

    Handmade cigars are composed of filler tobacco bunched together with a binder leave and finally covered with the wrapper leaf. Cigars with long leaves bunched together as filler are called "long filler" cigars. Cigars with short, fragmented leaves bunched together as filler are called "short filler" cigars. The binder holds the bunch together and is enclosed with the wrapper leaf in an aesthetically pleasing manner.

    Machine made cigars are generally produced using short filler. A processed tobacco binder which resembles brown paper is used as the binder, and in most cases a natural wrapper is used to complete the cigar.



    Cigar Basics

    Length – Cigars are described by the length (inches) and the ring size.

    Ring Size – Ring size is the diameter of the cigar and is measure buy a gauge, the most common being 42 to 44 on the gauge. The size of a cigar, in name, is pretty much meaningless because when determined by name such as Churchill or Robusto it is not a universal standard. In other words, one company's Robusto is another company's Churchill even though both measure the exact same length and ring gauge. All you really have to know is that cigars are categorized by length and ring gauge, which is a fraction of an inch measured in 64ths. A cigar with a 52 ring gauge, for example, measures 52/64 of an inch in diameter.



    Body - The body is the strength of the cigar. Generally there are three groups, Mild, Medium, and Full. The strength of most cigars can be determined by the country where they were manufactured. The following list shows cigar manufacturing countries and the strength of the cigars produced there:

    Mild Bodied: Jamaica, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, United States, Philippines
    Medium Bodied: Mexico, Honduras (med-full), Nicaragua (med-full), Brazil
    Full Bodied: Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Cuba



    Cigar Cutting/Lighting

    Picking - Pick the color wrapper you prefer dark or light. Gently feel the cigar between your fingers (don't roll it because that could cause the wrapper to crack) to see if it's too moist or too dry. Inspect the construction of the cigar to ensure there are no cracks in the wrapper and the cap is in good condition. While some cigar smokers like to hold the cigar up to their nose and sniff the product, others find this distasteful when they see someone put a cigar up to their nose and then put it back in the box. If you must smell the tobacco, just hold your nose 12 inches over the box of opened cigars and take a breath; this should be sufficient to determine the bouquet of the cigar, and it will cause fewer problems for other customers.

    How to Judge a Cigar (the 3 C's)

    Construction - How well is the cigar made? How does it feel to the touch? With a firm, but soft grip feel it from end to end. Does it feel consistent all the way through? Are there any hard or soft spots? A cigar that is too hard, too soft, or inconsistent will not draw properly.

    Condition - Cigars should be well conditioned before smoking. Cigars should be aged for several months to several years at the proper humidity (70% RH) and temperature (70° F). A dry cigar will burn hot, fast and can taste harsh. A damp cigar will be hard to light and can be hard to draw.

    Causality (cause and effect) - How does the cigar taste? How does the cigar make you feel? Does the cigar build in taste, flavor and complexity as it burns? Or is it the same all the way through? Do you feel relaxed and calm after finishing it?

    Cutting - Many feel that a guillotine-style cigar cutter or cigar scissors are the most effective way to cut a premium cigar. Be careful not to cut beyond the cap of the cigar. Aside from a guillotine cutter, some smokers use a sharp knife, a cigar punch, a V-cutter, and some even use their teeth. Perhaps the most difficult cutting instrument to use is the scissor-style cutter, which requires practice, a steady hand, and a keen eye.

    You’ve only just begun and you’re already in a quandary: where to cut? Well, first of all, you are cutting the uncut portion of the cigar – the head. The basic rule of thumb is to cut just past the shoulder (where the cigar stops being round). A half inch in (or 1.5 cm) usually does it, but that measure isn’t a universal guideline because of the various shapes in which a cigar may manifest itself.


    The Torpedo Cigar


    The Round Cigar

    Lighting - The foot, or tip, of the cigar should be lit using a long wooden cigar match or butane lighter. Avoid candles, paper matches, a stove, and lighters that use lighter fluid (naphtha) because the chemicals and odors can affect the taste of the tobacco. When using a match, wait until the sulfur burns off before lighting the cigar. The ideal device is a wooden match and the best lighter is a butane lighter.

    Start lighting a cigar by holding it at a 45-degree angle over the flame, about three to four inches from the tip of the cigar (depending on the height of the flame you're using) and rotate the cigar until the foot begins to ignite. Never letting the flame touch the cigar, slowly puff on the cigar while rotating it around the flame.

    Take a look at the foot and make sure the cigar is burning evenly. You can gently blow on the foot to insure a complete lighting. Once the cigar is lit, let it sit for a minute as the short delay will allow the freshly-lit cigar to stabilize.

    First, you must "toast" the cigar's foot. Sounds odd, but the purpose of toasting is to ignite the outer layers of the tobacco (that’s the binder and the wrapper) that hold the cigar together. If you just held up a match and began to draw, only the inner tobacco – known as the filler – would ignite. If that happened, the cigar would burn unevenly and develop a poorly shaped ash (we'll explain why that's a problem in a moment).

    Toasting - To give the outer portion of your cigar a head start hold a match or lighter to the outside edge of the foot and rotate the cigar to evenly toast the edge. You’ll observe that the outside wrapper and binder will have a white, ashen aspect after they’ve been properly toasted.

    Filler - Next, it’s time to ignite the filler. Use a long wooden match or lighter to create a larger flame area so that you can light the entire foot evenly. Place the cigar between your lips. Then, hold the match about a half an inch from the cigar (the flame is drawn in) and rotate the cigar as you draw in air. When you release the pressure of inhalation (you don't actually inhale, but you know what we mean), a surge of flame should shoot up from the foot of the cigar and a puff of smoke should come from your mouth.
    Last edited by Acrylic; 2/10/2009 at 2:41 pm.

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    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Ash - Most premium handmade cigars will hold a very long ash before falling off. The ash on cheaper cigars tends to flake easily and fall off more frequently. Properly grown and maintained cigar tobacco will have a whiter ash than the sometimes very gray ash produced on lower-quality cigars. While some smokers like to see how long the ash on a cigar can grow before falling off by itself – keep in mind when in a public place where cigar smoking is permitted, or at a party, you don't want cigar ashes to fall on your clothes, a floor, or a rug. It's always wise as you see the ash starting to gain length to gently tap it off.

    Band On or Off - It's mostly a personal decision when opting to take a cigar band off or leave it on while smoking one’s favorite cigar. Some say that leaving the band on promotes conversation among cigar smokers, while others say it's a showy thing to do that displays a lack of proper cigar etiquette. If you do decide to remove the cigar band, make sure you let the cigar heat up before taking it off as the heat from the cigar will help loosen the glue that holds the band on. Remember too, that taking the band off some brands of Cuban cigars (even after heating), like the Montecristo, is very difficult and can result in damage to the cigar wrapper.

    Smoking – Smoke slow, about a draw a minute, to prevent your cigar from going out between puffs, give it a couple of extra quick, short draws coupled with quick exhales before you take a long draw of smoke to savor against you palate each time. You will be amazed at how this simple practice helps to improve any difficult burning cigar.

    Relighting and Putting a Cigar Out - Perhaps some of the most overlooked aspects of cigar smoking are relighting and extinguishing cigars. On the subject of relighting, cigars, by nature, will go out if not puffed on every few minutes, so relighting a fresh cigar isn't a problem. While some contend you can save a partially smoked cigar for more than 24 hours, it's best to avoid relighting a cigar that hasn't been smoked in more than two hours. When relighting a cigar, hold the flame in front of the foot and blow out to help expel any old gases or ash that may have become trapped in the cigar. After that, follow standard lighting procedures. To extinguish a cigar, just let it go out by itself in an ashtray. Stubbing-out a cigar produces a stale odor that can linger in a room. Once you're sure your cigar is out, dispose of it in a safe manner.

    Drink Paring
    Apple Cider
    Warm Apple Cider w/Capt Morgan
    Coffee (Cold or Warm)
    Dark Rum
    Scotch
    Bourbon
    Beer
    Dr. Pepper
    Coke/Pepsi
    Port
    Ale
    Porter
    Stout
    Wine (Red tends to pair better)



    Cigar Care/Storage

    Introduction - The ideal storage condition for a cigar are approximately 70% humidity at 68° Fahrenheit. Air at different temperatures will hold completely different amounts of moisture. Warm air can hold a tremendous amount of moisture. If your cigars are stored in a warm place, you will have to continuously add water to the humidifier. The result will be very spongy cigars. Cold air holds almost no moisture. Air with 70% humidity will be dry at freezing temperatures. Relative humidity is defined as the percentage of the maximum amount of water that air can hold at a given temperature without condensation. As a general rule, when the air temperature is reduced from 68 degrees by one degree, the humidity should be increased by 1%, and vice versa. Therefore, if your cigars were stored at 58 degrees Fahrenheit, the humidity should be kept around 80%. Dry cigars can be moisturized, but will never be quite as good as they were from the factory. To remoisturize a cigar, put it into a properly humidified environment for a very long period of time (6 months or more). The cigar will gradually absorb the surrounding humidity. Over humidified cigars that have become damp should be thrown away. The binder and filler of a cigar make up about 90% of the total mass of the cigar. Therefore, the binder and filler will also absorb over 90% of any excess humidity. When this happens, the body of the cigar swells, forcing the wrapper to expand.

    Storage - The best way to store cigars is in a humidor. The purpose of a humidor is to recreate the mild, humid climate of the Caribbean, where the cigars are made. Every humidor contains some kind of humidifying element. It is important that distilled water be used with this element because tap water causes mold to form and contains minerals that can destroy the effectiveness of some humidifiers. Over a period of time, the molded device will alter the flavor of the cigars. It is always a good idea to check the humidor’s moisture level at least once a week and make sure that no patches of mold have started to form on the cigars. If mold has started to form, the offending cigars should be removed and the humidor should be cleaned with a dry cloth and aired out. A light-gray dusting of bloom on the wrapper is permissible because that is a sign that the cigar is properly aging. A humidor can also be used to age cigars. While aging, cigars of the same brand should be kept together, without the cellophane, in a cedar-lined humidor. The benefit of this is to draw out any excessive moisture and allow the cigars to “marry.” Marriage is when the cigars absorb each other's oils and create one unique flavor. The cedar will also add to the flavor of the cigars. About once a week, the humidor should be opened for a few hours to let the air hit the cigars or they will acquire a musty taste.

    Humidification - Humidification is the only way to keep your cigars fresh indefinitely. Cigars should be stored under the following conditions: 65-75% humidity and 68-72 degrees Fahrenheit. A cigar that is dry smokes hot fast and unevenly. A cigar that is too moist will be hard to puff allow mold to form and/or the wrapper will swell and split open. I would recommend Heartfelt Humidity Beads, 65% or 70% depending on what you like best.

    Hygrometer - The hygrometer is a device used for measuring the relative humidity inside of your humidor. There are two varieties. Analog - This is the standard type of hygrometer. They are the least expensive and also the least reliable. They operate with a needle controlled by a hairspring that points to the correct percentage of humidity. Digital - Far more reliable, but also considerably more expensive. The digital hygrometer operates on a standard camera or watch battery and digitally reads the humidity as well as the temperature. This device is by no means perfect, but is still much more accurate than the analog hygrometers. Calibrating An Analog Hygrometer - Wrap the hygrometer in a hot damp towel. When the needle is buried at the highest humidity possible, unwrap it and leave it exposed until the needle points to 70-75% humidity and place it back in your humidor. Most likely it still will never be perfectly accurate.

    Breaking In Your New Humidor
    1. Activate and attach your humidifier and hygrometer
    2. Add a cup of distilled water into the humidor and close the lid or scrub the humidor with a lint free cloth.
    3. Wait 24 to 48 hours, and then fill the humidor at least halfway to regulate the humidity.
    4. Check your cigars every day for freshness. Gently squeeze the foot of the cigar; it should have some spring to it like a loaf of bread.
    5. Slowly begin adding more cigars to the humidor and continue checking them every day. Eventually you will be able to go several days without checking them.
    6. Even after your humidor is completely broken in, it is still a good idea to check them every day for freshness.

    Aging - Aging is really hit or miss, most of the time a well aged (1-3 years) cigar will bring out new complex flavors and smells but some are better left fresh. Aging can make a bad cigar a good cigar or a good cigar a bad cigar. Aging also has to do with ring size, obviously the thicker the cigar the greater the variety of tobacco leaves and the more complex the flavor will be. To properly age a cigar the environment also plays a huge role, keep it at 70-70, any more and you risk beetles and mold and any less the process slows. Cigar Aging

    Revive Dry Cigars -
    Keep in mind that if cigars are very dry they will be difficult to revive. Use a seal able plastic container, like Tupperware or even a Ziplock bag. Seal it tight for the first two days. This will trap any moisture still left in the cigars. On the third day, add the piece of dampened sponge (distilled water only), be sure not to over-saturate the sponge and to keep the lid propped open in one corner to allow air flow. The idea is to allow slow absorption of moisture, preventing the cigars from getting too much humidity too soon which can actually make them burst. This can take several weeks to over a month, so be patient. Rotate the cigars every few days, keep this up continuously and in about three to four weeks you should be able to enjoy them. When cigars lose a certain amount of moisture, they also lose much of their bouquet and will probably not taste as good as a well-kept cigar. The key to all of this is cigars lose moisture slowly, therefore, they need to regain it slowly. Once again, be patient and never resort to drastic measures to revive your cigars or you'll ruin them permanently.
    Last edited by Acrylic; 11/17/2008 at 6:08 pm.

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    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Cigar Recommendations

    Beginner -
    Macanudo
    La Aurora Cameroon
    5 Vegas Gold Series
    Cusano 18 Double Connecticut
    Gurkha Doble Maduro
    Rocky Patel Connecticut
    Rocky Patel The Edge Lite
    Romeo y Julieta 1875
    Fonseca
    Carlos Torano 1916 Cameroon
    Ashton Benchmade
    Perdomo Lot 23
    Romeo y Julieta Bully
    Padron 2000

    Intermediate -
    Onyx Reserve
    Padron 3000 (M)
    Padron 1964 Anniversary (M)
    Padron Panatela
    El Rey del Mundo (M)
    Rocky Patel Vintage 1992
    Rocky Patel Sun Grown
    Ashton Virgin Sun Grown
    Partagas Black
    Trinidad (D.R.)
    Camacho SLR
    Arturo Fuente Anejo
    Torano Virtuoso
    Cusano 18
    Perdomo Reserve
    Diamond Crown Maximus
    La Aurora Anos
    Sancho Panza
    Arturo Fuente Hemingway
    CAO Criollo
    CAO CX2
    Flor de Olivia
    Montecristo

    Strong Cigars -
    Camachos
    Rocky Patel Edge
    Olivia "O" Bold
    Joya De Nicaragua Antanos
    La Flor Dominicana Ligero Double Ligero Chisel
    Bolivar Belicoso Fino
    CAO Extreme
    Juan Lopez Epicure # 1
    El Rey Del Mundo Robusto
    Partagas Black Label
    Joya De Nicaragua
    El Rico Habano
    Quinteros
    Romeo y Juliet Hermoso #2 IL
    Siglo VI
    Romeo y Juliet Cazadore
    Litto Gomez
    H Upmann Corona Major
    Cohiba Siglo 2
    Opus X
    CAO Brazilia Pirahna
    La Gloria Cubana Serie R #5


    Top25Cigar.com Top 25 Sub $6.00 Cigars

    Top25Cigar.com Overall Top 25 Rated Cigars

    A Few To Stay Away From -
    La O'Paree Corona
    Takoma Corona Blue
    Takoma Corona Red
    Flor De Filipinas Corona
    Flor De Filipinas Robusto
    Cuban Delights Robusto
    Don Macho Corona
    Regalos Robusto
    Don Macho Rothschild
    Don Felo Petit (Felito)
    Sacuba Corona
    Regalos Cigarillo
    1 Plus Robusto
    Burma Petit



    Online Resources

    Vendors I Recommend:
    Cigars International - (Free Shipping: http://www.cigarsintl.com/FREEPM3)
    JR Cigars
    Cigar.com
    Famous-Smoke
    Tampa Humidor
    Atlantic Cigar
    Show Me Your Ash
    Holts
    Tinder Box
    TNT Cigars
    Serious Cigars
    BestCigarPrices.com
    Cheaper Cigars
    Heartfelt Industries
    Cigarmony
    Taboo Cigars

    Others:
    Mikes Cigars
    Silo Cigars
    CigarExpress
    New Havana Cigars
    Cigar Tycoon
    Corona Cigar
    Black Cat Cigars
    Neptune Cigar
    Arnolds Tobacco
    Cigar Solutions
    Cuban Crafters
    Rockys Cigars
    The Cigar Humidor
    Fumee World
    Cigars Direct
    Cigars Etc
    Cigar-ette City
    Cigar Place
    Tex Cigars
    Lil Brown

    Vendors that ship to Canada at a decent rate: (Thanks Zook)
    Cigar.com
    Tampa Humidor
    Show Me Your Ash
    Cheaper Cigars
    Taboo Cigars
    New Havana Cigars
    Cigar Tycoon
    Neptune Cigar
    The Cigar Humidor
    Fumee World
    Cigars Etc
    Cigar Place
    Todays Cigar
    Joe Cigar
    Cigar Monster
    Cheap Humidors

    Daily Specials:
    Todays Cigar
    Joe Cigar
    Cigar Monster

    Bidding & Auctions:
    Cigar Bid
    Cigar Auctioneer
    JR Cigar Auction

    Price Listings:
    CigarCyclopedia Comparison Shopper
    Cigar Price Club
    Cigar Spider

    Review Sites:
    Top 25 Cigar
    Cigar Aficionado
    Cigar Review
    Smoke Mag
    Cigar Magazine

    General Information:
    Cigar - Wikipedia
    Cigar Handbook
    Cigar Nexus
    Smoke Mag
    Cigar Cyclopedia
    Cigar Group FAQ's
    Holy Smoke Beginners Advice
    Duke City Cigars
    Paul Stulac Cigar Tips

    Humidors:
    Aristocrat Humidors
    Cheap Humidors
    Humidor Guide
    Cigar Humidors Online
    Humidor Vault
    Cigar Humidor Store
    Humidor Wholesaler

    Manufacturers:
    Davidoff
    CAO
    AVO
    Gran Habano
    Oliva
    Torano
    Illusione
    Cigars of Brazil
    Padilla
    La Flor
    Gurkha
    Padron
    Felipe Gregorio
    Santa Clara
    Nat Sherman
    Drew Estate
    Bucanero Cigars
    Rocky Patel



    Cigar Dossier
    Cigar Dossier


    My Reviews
    Click Here



    My Stash
    Last edited by Acrylic; 4/30/2009 at 9:23 am.

  4. #4
    BANNED Zook's Avatar
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    For us Canadian folk, the selection is a bit smaller:

    Cigar.com
    Tampa Humidor
    Show Me Your Ash
    Cheaper Cigars
    Taboo Cigars
    New Havana Cigars
    Cigar Tycoon
    Neptune Cigar
    The Cigar Humidor
    Fumee World
    Cigars Etc
    Cigar Place
    Todays Cigar
    Joe Cigar
    Cigar Monster
    Cheap Humidors

    I've also removed a few that do ship to Canada, but have very high shipping charges.

  5. #5
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zook View Post
    For us Canadian folk, the selection is a bit smaller:

    Cigar.com
    Tampa Humidor
    Show Me Your Ash
    Cheaper Cigars
    Taboo Cigars
    New Havana Cigars
    Cigar Tycoon
    Neptune Cigar
    The Cigar Humidor
    Fumee World
    Cigars Etc
    Cigar Place
    Todays Cigar
    Joe Cigar
    Cigar Monster
    Cheap Humidors

    I've also removed a few that do ship to Canada, but have very high shipping charges.
    Thanks Zook, I'll add these to the OP.

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    SUPER THREAD BUMP.

    Acrylic jump started my collection:



    RP The Edge Sumatra
    RP Vintage 1992 Second
    Padron 3000 Maduro
    CFNO Plantation Reverse
    Ashton Heritage Puro Sol Belicoso #2
    Punch Elite
    H. Upmann 1844 Robusto #100
    Romeo y Julieta Deluxe #2

    And then I picked myself up 10 Gurkha Kapre's when I bought my humidor.

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    i thoroughly enjoy the macanudo maduro #5

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    Bad-ass Member sixtninecoug's Avatar
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    Looking up this thread reminded me that I have a couple cigars that have been sitting around way too long.
    (i do enjoy a cigar every so often, but im not familar with the brands so much, so pardon any typos or mangled marques)

    I have 2 5 Vegas Golds
    1 Arturo Fuente Special Selection
    and 1 K Hansotia and Co Ancient Warrior "Special Edition/Limited Vintage"

    Now, they have been sitting around a while, and i dont have a hunidor. They all seem rather dry so whats the best way to go about rehabbing them so i can have an enjoyable smoke?

  9. #9
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sixtninecoug View Post
    Looking up this thread reminded me that I have a couple cigars that have been sitting around way too long.
    (i do enjoy a cigar every so often, but im not familar with the brands so much, so pardon any typos or mangled marques)

    I have 2 5 Vegas Golds
    1 Arturo Fuente Special Selection
    and 1 K Hansotia and Co Ancient Warrior "Special Edition/Limited Vintage"

    Now, they have been sitting around a while, and i dont have a hunidor. They all seem rather dry so whats the best way to go about rehabbing them so i can have an enjoyable smoke?
    Are the wrappers split or cracked?

    Keep in mind that if cigars are very dry they will be difficult to revive. Use a sealable plastic container, like Tupperware or even a Ziplock bag. Seal it tight for the first two days. This will trap any moisture still left in the cigars. On the third day, add the piece of dampened (DISTILLED WATER) sponge, be sure not to over-saturate the sponge and to keep the lid propped open in one corner to allow air flow. The idea is to allow slow absorption of moisture, preventing the cigars from getting too much humidity too soon which can actually make them burst. This can take several weeks to over a month, so be patient. Rotate the cigars every few days, keep this up continuously and in about three to four weeks you should be able to enjoy them. When cigars lose a certain amount of moisture, they also lose much of their bouquet and will probably not taste as good as a well-kept cigar. The key to all of this is cigars lose moisture slowly, therefore, they need to regain it slowly. Once again, be patient and never resort to drastic measures to revive your cigars or you'll ruin them permanently.

  10. #10
    The Fucking King!
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    its also worth pointing out that if they've been sitting around for a long time, then they've most probably lost their oils etc and you wont be able to revive them to the smoke they once were. But then again if you'r not smoking cigars all the time or at least even every now and then, your not going to notice much of a difference.

    i havent had a cigar in a few months because of the terrible weather here anything new in the humi acrylic? Also are you at cigar asylum now?

  11. #11
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stefan8706 View Post
    its also worth pointing out that if they've been sitting around for a long time, then they've most probably lost their oils etc and you wont be able to revive them to the smoke they once were. But then again if you'r not smoking cigars all the time or at least even every now and then, your not going to notice much of a difference.

    i havent had a cigar in a few months because of the terrible weather here anything new in the humi acrylic? Also are you at cigar asylum now?
    I dont smoke much these months either. Nothing new, been saving money for other things and I still have a stash to keep me going strong for a while

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    I have lots of Seniority bville's Avatar
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    lol holy shit. this is pretty informative.

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    Elite Whore
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    I started smoking cigars about 6 months ago...and I fucking love it. I am only smoking one cigar every other weekend usually..

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    Nice post.

    We have a local cigar shop that is really fucking nice and I was sitting in there last weekend and the guy at the shop cut my cigar for me. He cut it like inward. So if you were looking at the top of the cigar and the cigar was aiming at the floor the cut was like this \/. It was sweet but I didn't see how he did it.

    http://knoxcigar.com

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    BANNED Zook's Avatar
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    RP The Edge Sumatra
    RP Vintage 1992 Second
    Padron 3000 Maduro
    CFNO Plantation Reverse
    And a bunch of Gurkha Kapre

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    I'm starting to post
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    I'm not familiar with the cut that you mention Knoxman.

    My favorite cutter is a punch cut. I find it really does direct the cigar into my mouth and intensify the cigar. However, I have found there are some cigars that I don't like the punch and go back to my double blade. Helix is one cigar brand in particular that comes across as overly bitter if I use my punch cut.

  17. #17
    ΜΟΛΩΝ ΛΑΒΕ Acrylic's Avatar
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    Bump. Stupid winter, I am going to be in Texas for a few days in Feb and will be sure to update this when I get a chance to smoke a few

  18. #18
    Someone posts A LOT Deepinpoon's Avatar
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    I'm not much of a cigar buff, but my dad is huge on them. He smokes around 10 a week, maybe a little bit less. He's been telling me more and more about them but I think I've had pretty much every one on the beginners list and a couple on the intermediate. Thanks for all the info on cigars. I haven't had a chance to read everything yet but i wanted to show some appreciation and I'm going to read up on them. Hopefully after this my dad won't sit around and call me a cigar noob anymore.
    Lets welcome the DUKE to the Baltimore Orioles

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    I thought this thread used to be gigantic.
    [cursive]Joshua[/cursive]

  20. #20
    I have lots of Seniority LOSER MIKE's Avatar
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    great post acrylic.
    i work at a smoke shop and we have a cabinet (7 feet long by 1.5 feet wide. 5 shelves. cabinet built with the correct wood. not too familiar with the name. one humidifier located at the bottom left of cabinet with one analog hygrometer) with about 60 different types of cigars.
    we have a big humidity problem, it's between 45-55 at best.
    i've added that humidifying solution to the water and it doesn't help much.

    i'll read over this guide at work tomorrow and see if i can improve the atmosphere for the cigars.
    thanks

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