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Thread: My Pizza Recipe

  1. #41
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    im gonna update my OP after midterms probably. the pizzas have improved significantly since the one I posted, you guys will be pleased with it I think.

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    Bad-ass Member groven's Avatar
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    Just used the recipe turned out great:
    Alfredo sauce, chicken, bacon, black olives, sun dried tomatoes, onion, and cheese

  3. #43
    I have lots of Seniority oscar's Avatar
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    just coming in to say i use almost the same recipe for my dough as far as flour/liquids go.. i usually use a bit more oil and a bit less water

    6 1/2 cup flour [you can take out 1/2 to a cup of all purpose u/b for cornmeal]
    2 1/2 c water
    1/2 c oil [dont go too strong of an evoo or it will overpower the other flavors]
    sugar, i usually eyeball this, but id say about a tbsp [dont forget, depending on what youre doing you can use honey/molasses as a substitute]
    salt, about a tbsp
    1 1/2 tbsp yeast, dry active

    when im making pizza ill add about a half cup of fresh grated parmesan (loosely packed) into that recipe.. youll make 3-4 pizzas depending on size. im not against dry herbs, either.. i usually dont use them though.

    i typically make this amount, which is about double his recipe, and store it for later use (breads.. usually).

    you can keep a dough recipe similar to this on hand, always.. so long as you store it properly and use it frequently enough. if you dont, it will try out and become unusable. if you take care of it you can continue your dough, adding the new dough to the old. it will become more 'sour' the longer you keep it, which is sometimes desirable in bread. sour or not, it means you can have fresh pizza, bread, flatbreads, within minutes at any given moment.

    also, as far as the mixing goes.. mix the water, oil, sugar, and yeast together. you only wait to for it to become "cloudy," as antrax says, to make sure the bacteria (yeast) is still alive. you really dont need to wait because 99% of yeast is going to respond. there really is no issue with yeast unless its far beyond expiration. add the salt with the flour because salt inhibits the growth of yeast (you can use this rule for pretty much any time you are using yeast and salt in a recipe). wait for it to double, use it as desired.. weigh out 1 1/2 # for a baugette (dont use oil in your recipe!).. measure 8-12 oz for a pizza (depending on how big, obv)

    top as desired, as always.. for a pizza.

    as far as bread goes, it depends on what youre thinking, soft crust, hard crust.. sandwich loaf or rolls.. dinner rolls.. savory, filled breads.. focaccia, pitas, naan, etc. if youre interested in these, let me know.. as i said, the recipe is about the same as the pizza dough he listed, and the recipe i gave. for breads i wouldnt use cornmeal, always consider the fat (you can always use melted butter instead of canola [making a SOFT bread]!). some can have addition of egg.. pastrys (croissant, puff, etc) are completely different.

    tangent aside, always remember you can make your pizza dough in bulk and do some of these other crazy things on the side.. its impressive.


    --


    as happy mentioned, definitely punch down the dough before you use it.. and re-proof it for breads.. yeah, bricks are awesome.. and always set the temp as high as the oven will allow. seriously, if you can bake that fucker at 750 F, do it.. i have stones and a peel for my pizzas and breads.. i have loaf pans, and even baugette pans.

    someone mentioned bread flour. i definitely would not do that for pizza.. and i usually use a/p for bread. you have to use different amounts of water for bread flours. usually cake flour sits at about 2% protein, a/p 3%, bread 4%. i know king arthurs a/p is 4%.. you need more liquid for more gluten. really, youve gotta develop a handfeel for the doughs when you get into experimenting with different brands and types of flour, combined with water to fat ratios.. for pizzas, stick to a/p or an a/p cornmeal blend.


    also, i take no offense to the baking comment. i can cook pretty well at this point, and im only getting better.. i keep baking on the back burner and always impress people with it. learnin some of that shit can be worth it, if youve got a tooth for a sweet tooth
    Last edited by oscar; 10/18/2010 at 2:33 am.

    Originally posted by eclipse
    when your as hard as i am you don't need a reason to fight, people look at me wrong and i have to throw down.. its principle

  4. #44
    Master of Posting Zoxygen's Avatar
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    If you guys can, I would start converting your dough recipes to weights instead of volume, your get much more consistent products.

    Quote Originally Posted by CroCop View Post
    hes a god damn legend, you shut your gypsy mouth

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    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    I don't personally mind the variability. It's never noticeably different but not measuring precisely or weighing gives it more of a...homemade touch.

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    Master of Posting Zoxygen's Avatar
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    While you may be able to get by with pizza dough because its covered up by cheese, sauce and toppings it's a good practice to get into while baking anything. Baking dough without weighing makes getting the proper hydration ratio almost impossible. Its like throwing a dart at a dartboard at night.

    Hydration ratio is key in just about every good bread recipe and if you don't know how much flour you have you'll never know your hydration ratio and that makes making adjustment to your recipe a mute point.

    Quote Originally Posted by CroCop View Post
    hes a god damn legend, you shut your gypsy mouth

  7. #47
    I have lots of Seniority oscar's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zoxygen View Post
    If you guys can, I would start converting your dough recipes to weights instead of volume, your get much more consistent products.
    its about 750 grams of flour.. but i usually do it by eye and feel. my bread is pretty consistent, trust it. i get practice.

    i dont expect most to have a kitchen scale, as i do.. so i gave a measurement more common. but yes, you are correct.

    Originally posted by eclipse
    when your as hard as i am you don't need a reason to fight, people look at me wrong and i have to throw down.. its principle

  8. #48
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    My buddy lost the recipe so I wrote it down for him again. Since I typed it out I figure I may as well update the OP while I'm at it.

  9. #49
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    I think i know what I'm doing today....you would think after cooking all week I'd use my days off to do something else, but nope. Must be a sign I chose the right career. Ill report back with pics.

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    Not a New Bitch evg005's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by nerd View Post
    Tried this recipe out tonight and it was freaking great. I suck at rolling dough, so it wasn't even close to round... or square, but it tasted really good.

    lol, dude were you selling this pizza! looks like when i order pizza take out. they jew you on the pepperonis ! ha

    slap that peperoni on!!

    salami/peperoni combo is bomb too

  11. #51
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    Made reddit front page with this recipe, like a boss.

  12. #52
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    So I added an egg to my dough recipe last night. I'm not culinary expert so I find it hard to describe how it changed it, but I definitely did notice a difference (some others didn't, but this pizza recipe is my baby and I notice all).

    Anyways, it seemed more... flaky I guess. It also seemed to act different when biting through it, like it didn't tear like bread as it usually does, but sort of pulled apart. I don't know how much of it was due to the egg and how much I may have been noticing simply because I was looking for changes, but it was an improvement I'd say.

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    You're not crazy, adding egg to the dough does change the texture of the pizza. Essentially you're adding more protein to the dough. The same effect happens when bakers use different types of flours (high vs. low protein) to achieve different texture/types of breads.

    Usually egg is added to deep dish pizza. It helps it rise in the pan and makes for a softer and chewier crust. While the traditional crispy (thin-crust) pizza omits the egg.

  14. #54
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    Ah, I see. Yeah I think I will definitely be adding an egg every time now. Really liked the results.

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    ive been trying my own pizza for a little while now and ive found that refridgerating the dough is really a must do

    the recipe ive been using definitely needs to be doubled though. cold dough doesnt stretch out for shit. but damn it has the perfect consistency when baked. definitely what i was looking for.

    also ive been using bread flour, but i think i'll try all purpose for now on instead.
    a pizza stone would be great to have too but meh. my oven struggles to get up to 500 (max temp it can go) so its not worth it. i do bottom rack on cornmeal pan at 450

    also ive read that high gluten flour is the real way to go to make american style crust aka papa johns style. too expensive.
    and someone who worked at a local pizza place said adding eggs to the dough is best

  16. #56
    Master of Posting Antrax's Avatar
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    I love letting my dough sit in the fridge a day or two, really prefer that actually, but often times I end up making it only a few hours before for dinner that night. But if I do refrigerate it, I take it out in the morning and let it warm up before crafting up the pizza.

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